By

Nohea

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Ahilapalapa Rands

Ahilapalapa Rands (Kanaka Maoli, Fijian,Sāmoan, Cook Island, Pākehā) is an independent curator and artist. She holds a Bachelor of Visual Arts from...
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Tremayne Nez

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Tremayne Nez from the Navajo Nation talks about his community and his experience in Washington D.C. for the...
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Year in Review 2019

@nanealo and @nohealani16 discuss the history of Native Stories, journey through @thepurpleprize, review of 2019, and some insight into the future. Mahalo...
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Kauʻi Baumhofer – Inter-generational/historical trauma

The most dangerous time for our people... is institutional racism, which is when an institution, organization, or government has policies, practices, procedures or laws, that give or afford unearned privilege to one group or another, and that is exactly what is happening up on this mauna.

Jamaica Heoli Osorio – Wahine line

See how powerful the people of Hawaii can be, and we wield a real serious force, that we can push in whatever direction we want, and I really hope that we are not just looking back in history to this beautiful time when we all came together and then it stopped, but really look back and see "oh that was another beginning to how we got right here right now in whatever issue we were fighting then."

Mauna Kea Series – Noelani Ahia on Mauna Medic Healers Hui

Our intention is to create a nurturing space, a space of empowerment...a brave space for people to feel comfortable truth telling. One of the things we’ve noticed on the Mauna is there’s a lot of historical/cultural trauma going on. I hope that our wahine space is one of those spaces where wahine, māhū, kāne, everyone feels comfortable to come into a nurturing space where they can truth tell, share their own moolelo for how they got here.

Mauna Kea Series – Paul Punahele Kutzen on Hawaiʻi Hip Hop

Struggling in the hood, figuring out that I’d rather have the ʻāina back then eat spam and have EBT, hip hop solved my problems by expressing it, so I figured I might as well teach youth this craft that helped me learn discipline and bless me with a better outlook on life and help me navigate through struggle.

Mauna Kea Series – Marie Alohalani Brown and Hale Hōʻahu +Hale Hoʻolako

For too long our intimate connection with our environment has been interrupted by western ways of being and knowing that was imposed upon us... so that’s what’s so exciting about Puʻu Huluhulu, is that we are coming back and living in one with our environment and getting to know the elements and the changing of the seasons... and what is more Ea then that?

Mauna Kea Series – Mahealani Ahia on Hale Mana Wāhine

Our intention is to create a nurturing space, a space of empowerment...a brave space for people to feel comfortable truth telling. One of the things we’ve noticed on the Mauna is there’s a lot of historical/cultural trauma going on. I hope that our wahine space is one of those spaces where wahine, māhū, kāne, everyone feels comfortable to come into a nurturing space where they can truth tell, share their own moʻōlelo for how they got here.

Mauna Kea Series – Kahala Johnson on Hale Mana Māhū

Outside of public-school sex education, learning about the sexuality, the gender, the sexual practices of my ancestors have helped me as a māhū to decolonize my body, my relationships, so Sex Eaducation is uncovering what is always conscious, we are constantly in a sexual relationship with the ʻāina.

Mauna Kea Series – Laʻakea Sanborn on Kanaka Rangers

Kanaka rangers is modeled after a program in Australia where the indigenous peoples of those lands… the way that they saw fit… where you are getting the native indigenous people of those lands to take on kuleana of stewardship, also legislation and enforcement to those resources to belong to those people.

Kaimana Kawaha – ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi + Mele Hawaiʻi

Those mele lāhui are probably one of the most important things to hold onto because they connect us. Within those mele, they keep us conscious about what being part of the lāhui is like, they express how we feel about being in the lāhui. It’s very personal but very true to you as a kanaka.

Dr. Noenoe Wong-Wilson

I was the first wahine, the first woman that was asked to stand up, so they put their handcuff/strips on me and walked me to the vehicle. There was silence, but there were tears, there were tears of love. The policemen wept, and we wept, and all of the young people wept in silence. And we asked to do that, and give every kupuna their day.

Hanau Ea

Na Pua o Haumea Indigenous Birthkeepers in partnership with La Ho’iho’i Ea Honolulu presents HANAU EA: RECLAMATION AND RESURGENCE OF INDIGENOUS MIDWIFERY...
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Nā Wāhine Koa

Nā Wāhine Koa documents the life of four mana Hawaiian wahine for sovereignty and demilitarization. Being interviewed is Aunty Terri, one of...
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